SO IT GOES.

Apparently I only post maps of San Francisco, references to linguistics and pictures of cats. I have yet to find anything that combines all three.

Jaime likes pie now.

I’d watch Margaery do anything, but she really needs a spinoff where she just announces various pastries.

(Source: brienneoftarth)

krismukai:

kylefewell:

sachinteng:

30 Day Challenge // Day 23 // Something That Makes You Happy

I’ve learned how to cook since I moved out to California. It’s therapeutic. And delicious~ I garnish everything with a fried egg, and I never regret it.

This is great

Holy…shit….sachin… (;o;



reblogged from iamdanw
Jonathan Ive, the much-feted British-born designer of the iPod, iPad, iPhone and other Apple gizmos appeared, larger than life, on the screen. “Thank,” he said at the end of his two-minute message of congratulations. Before he could add “you”, the screen froze and the limits of nascent digital technology and design left poor Ive’s face stuck in a ginormous gurn.

Plans for £80m new Design Museum unveiled, from the Guardian (via iamdanw)

I wish there was a photograph for this.

(via blech)

"Gurn" is a fantastic word.

This feels like the mall version of a toast sandwich.

This feels like the mall version of a toast sandwich.

(Source: alanshepard)

We had a character recently, Janet Zappos, like the website, and we were like, “We can’t do that because it’s a trademarked name.” So we reversed Zappos and made it Janet Soppaz. And then I took that entire thing and did it again. So the character’s name is Janet Soppaz Zappos Soppaz Zappos. It’s one of my highest achievements.

Mindy Kaling and Mike Schur Give Good Banter — Vulture

I love you, @kentremendous

According to AnnaLee Saxenian, the dean of the School of Information at the University of California-Berkeley and an expert on talent markets and regional comparative advantage… Swedish Pop Mafia - Pacific Standard: The Science of Society
Really wasn’t expecting a reference to the dean of my grad school program in an article about Max Martin and catchy Swedish pop music.
hatchworthsmoustache:

snowbouquet:

Only on the internet could you find a shark in a cat suit riding a roomba.

hatchworthsmoustache:

snowbouquet:

Only on the internet could you find a shark in a cat suit riding a roomba.

blech:

? \o/ (via toffeemilkshake)

blech:

? \o/ (via toffeemilkshake)

(Source: toffeemilkshake)

vizual-statistix:

My dad is the crossword champion of our family – it’s rare that he can’t polish off the Saturday puzzle. I, on the other hand, am usually googling (i.e., cheating) by Wednesday. I’m just more of a KenKen guy.
After creating the chess square utilization graphic last week, I realized it might be interesting to run a similar analysis on crossword puzzle grids. I pulled the grids of just over 7400 crosswords from The New York Times – the database included all Will Shortz-era puzzles, starting November 21, 1993 through March 10, 2014. I then removed grids with non-standard dimensions. Standard for Monday to Saturday is 15x15. The majority of Sunday puzzles are 21x21; while there are some 23x23, they account for less than 10% of the Sunday puzzles.
I then calculated, separately for each day of the week, how often each box was a blank (black shaded square) versus a box with a character (part of a solution). I’ve used the word “character” because, though the entry is almost always an individual letter, it can sometimes be something tricky like a number or multiple letters.
The percentage shown after the day of the week represents the average percentage of boxes for that day that requires characters. So, as the week goes by, the puzzles have fewer and fewer black boxes and more white boxes needing answers.
The shading scale ranges from 40% to 100%; the former indicates that a box contains a character (i.e., is not shaded black) in 40% of puzzles on that day of the week, while the latter specifies that a box has always required a character. The actual lowest value for any puzzle is 39.8%, which appears as black squares in two locations on Monday. All values for individual boxes are written in blue.
Note the striking similarity between Monday through Thursday puzzles, with Monday having the most contrast and Thursday, the least. Friday and Saturday appear similar and have comparable percentages, while the larger Sunday grid is in a league of its own. I’ve also provided the average of the Monday through Saturday puzzles. This allows you to see which boxes have never been black on a non-Sunday puzzle.
Data source: http://www.xwordinfo.com/ (If you’ve never seen this site, check it out – they have some amazing statistics on the NYTimes Crossword!)

vizual-statistix:

My dad is the crossword champion of our family – it’s rare that he can’t polish off the Saturday puzzle. I, on the other hand, am usually googling (i.e., cheating) by Wednesday. I’m just more of a KenKen guy.

After creating the chess square utilization graphic last week, I realized it might be interesting to run a similar analysis on crossword puzzle grids. I pulled the grids of just over 7400 crosswords from The New York Times – the database included all Will Shortz-era puzzles, starting November 21, 1993 through March 10, 2014. I then removed grids with non-standard dimensions. Standard for Monday to Saturday is 15x15. The majority of Sunday puzzles are 21x21; while there are some 23x23, they account for less than 10% of the Sunday puzzles.

I then calculated, separately for each day of the week, how often each box was a blank (black shaded square) versus a box with a character (part of a solution). I’ve used the word “character” because, though the entry is almost always an individual letter, it can sometimes be something tricky like a number or multiple letters.

The percentage shown after the day of the week represents the average percentage of boxes for that day that requires characters. So, as the week goes by, the puzzles have fewer and fewer black boxes and more white boxes needing answers.

The shading scale ranges from 40% to 100%; the former indicates that a box contains a character (i.e., is not shaded black) in 40% of puzzles on that day of the week, while the latter specifies that a box has always required a character. The actual lowest value for any puzzle is 39.8%, which appears as black squares in two locations on Monday. All values for individual boxes are written in blue.

Note the striking similarity between Monday through Thursday puzzles, with Monday having the most contrast and Thursday, the least. Friday and Saturday appear similar and have comparable percentages, while the larger Sunday grid is in a league of its own. I’ve also provided the average of the Monday through Saturday puzzles. This allows you to see which boxes have never been black on a non-Sunday puzzle.

Data source: http://www.xwordinfo.com/ (If you’ve never seen this site, check it out – they have some amazing statistics on the NYTimes Crossword!)